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Hi--

I received a call from my son that he has a fractured fibia and has been removed from his division, six days before PIR. He's supposed to see an osteopath tomorrow (Wednesday.)

Anyone know if seeing an Osteopath is standard procedure for SRs?

Anyone know what, if anything, we can send to him other than letters? He's likely crawling up the walls already.

His RDC called his recruiter to notify the recruiter of the division move and hopefully we'll get more information from the recruiter, but the lack of detailed information is killing us. Is there a source for information I'm missing?

Thanks in advance!

SH

Views: 401

Replies to This Discussion

Thanks for checking.  Mine is healing and getting antsy to get back to training.  Do you have an SR in RCU?

Thank you DSmom! My boy is healing well and we expect he will be released from RCU late next week. If so, he may PIR as early as 2 March.

Thanks so much for the well-wishes! The abrupt separation of basic is hard but that was nothing compared to the stress my husband and I have experienced since our boy was injured.

Well, we find out today if my boy's fibia is healed and he's ASMO'ing back to basic to finish his last six days.

It's been a tough month for all of us and I hope and pray it's over today.

If we don't hear from him today it means either the bone isn't completely healed or the osteopath decided to require rehab, though that shouldn't be the case. No guarantees, though.

Oddly our son has written much less in RCU than he did in his old division. He says there's nothing to write about because he doesn't do anything worth writing about. It makes sense I guess but I wish he'd write more!

To all with loved ones/kids in RCU, hang in there! There's not much else we can do and eventually you'll be waiting like I am now.

Well, so much for the 23rd.

Our son was told he'd see the osteopath on the 23rd, be AMSO'ed back to a division and move on. Because it will be a status change he'd get to call us with at least the scripted phone call.

Not one word yesterday. We have no idea what's going on. Maybe his leg hasn't healed completely, maybe he re-injured it while doing sit-ups or one leg push-ups, maybe they gave him rehab though they said they wouldn't, maybe he doesn't have a unit to ASMO into. Maybe he was kidnapped by aliens. We just don't know.

And that is driving me crazy.

The latest:

If I'd known from the beginning that the fracture was a compression fracture rather than a standard fracture I'd have known four weeks wasn't long enough. The fracture has calloused but hasn't yet completely calcified so it's another three weeks, then another visit to the osteopath and then who knows. It's best to wait since my boy has to pass jump school and his fibia must be able to take the stresses of that activity but it's hard on all of us.

Meanwhile my boy is ready to crawl out of his skin from boredom. He says he has to pare down his personal box because he has so much mail that he's running out of space but he's still bored. He says he can feel his body weakening and his brains leaking out of his ears with each passing day.

We wait some more.

Here we go again. Osteopath visit today, more X-rays and a decision regarding ASMO vs. battle stations without ASMO, or assigned physical therapy. He's been in normal boots for over a week (he says he's allowed to do that) and he has full range of motion in both ankle and knee, so I don't know what they'd have him do in physical therapy but who knows.

It's the not knowing that's killing us. We live for Sunday calls and the long-awaited scripted call that he's ASMOing into a division or going to battle stations and graduating alone.

It's definitely purgatory.

Wow, it's been a ride. But we've all survived RCU! My husband and I received word Tuesday night (May 8) that our son was declared Fit for Duty (FFD) that morning and completed Firefighting Apps that afternoon. He's now in DIV 2240, a division specifically for recruits awaiting the next Battle Stations. It was a two-minute call so we didn't get anything more, but the end of purgatory is here.

Because our son was so close to graduating when he injured himself, he was given the option of going through Battle Stations as a "straggler" and not participating in a PIR or ASMOing into another standard division and repeating a week or two of basic, then having PIR. He chose going as a straggler. Once he completes Battle Stations he will go to the Temporary Holding Unit until his A school orders arrive.

THU is much better than RCU. He can have his phone, liberty during off-work hours, etc.

The best advice I can offer parents or other loved ones who are dealing with an RCU situation is to be patient, hard as it is particularly when dealing with the unknown. Sending lots of mail helps with morale and recognizing that short of sending mail, all you can do is wait for the every-other-Sunday call.

What helped our son most was being forced into working in the RCDs' office doing paperwork. As much as our boy dislikes paper-pushing the routine and sense of usefulness did wonders for his attitude and perspective. There are other tasks an SR can do to both help pass the time and gain a sense of usefulness.

We expected our son to graduate on January 26th and here we are in May. None of us expected this path, our son in particular, but he's learned a lot from the experience that will help him later in his Navy career and we, his parents, have learned to let go far faster than we expected.

That's great news!  Glad everything (finally) worked out and boy this has definitely been a great learning lesson for him.....Hurry up & wait and Semper Gumby (be flexible).

ROFL I love it! That's a t-shirt worthy logo, Semper Gumby.

Thanks B'sNukemom!

Hi! I don't know if you'll receive this because you updated us several months ago. My son's in RCU for a stress fracture. He was one week from PIR when he was injured. I'm wondering how common it is for someone to "straggle" to Battlestations versus joining a division?

Also, did your son have to pass another PFA before straggling to Battlestations? If so, was he in good shape for the PFA after several months recovering from his injury?

Thanks!

Hi Inkiri!

I texted my son to verify my answers before responding.

According to him, one has to pass a medical PFA, which means the recruit has to be able to perform all PFA activities (run, sit ups, push ups, etc.) without pain. There is no standard passing number for either amount or time. It's pass or fail depending on 1) whether the recruit experiences pain associated with the injury for which the recruit was admitted to RCU, and 2) the recruit performs all activities the physical therapist orders as part of treatment.

If your son passed the standard PFA with his division prior to being sent to RCU he probably won't have to repeat it. That said, the four plus months my son spent in RCU had a severe impact on his physical fitness. His fitness requirements upon arrival at GL were much more stringent than the PFA and he could pass the PFA when he left RCU but he's had problems with lost muscle mass and stamina, particularly in the pool.

Tell your son to ask his doctor what exercises he's allowed to do and do those as often as possible. It's not ideal but it'll help him maintain some of his stamina and muscle mass.

The straggler question is uncertain. My son says he asked the Petty Officers about going through Battle Stations as a straggler and the POs managed the paperwork. The main factor was that my son had completed all but Battle Stations and Firefighting. ASMOing him would force him to repeat several weeks unnecessarily and his first division's RDCs reported that my son had no behavior chits, etc. It appears to be a case-by-case decision.

My son heard that RTC eliminated stragglers soon after he left RTC but that shouldn't be taken as gospel. If your son wants to go through Battle Stations as a straggler he needs to talk with the POs. One thing to know is that stragglers end up in THU (Temporary Holding Unit) after Battle Stations is passed until their amended orders are completed since that process doesn't occur during the standard basic training time period. THU takes a couple of weeks or so but can be longer. The plus is that THU is regular Navy life. They can have phones, etc. It's far, far better than RCU.

Also, since THU is standard Navy rules they have liberty in the evening after work hours and get the liberty weekend given those who go through a PIR. As far as we know stragglers don't get a PIR but my son didn't care a whit about that. He was ready to leave RCU and missing PIR meant nothing to him.

I have six Sandboxx credits I don't need and would like to give to a mom with a child in RCU. If you're interested send me a message and we can exchange the information required to move those credits to you.

If I can help with anything else don't hesitate to ask here. RCU is a nightmare for both recruits and families and the GL Black Hole doesn't help. I might not be able to answer a question but I'll do my best.

Also, if your son is going to be in RCU for some time encourage him to volunteer to be a yeoman. That did more for my son's attitude and state of mind than anything else. The job involves lot of paperwork but it's a job rather than sitting around doing nothing, bored sick with nothing but time to obsess over how much RCU stinks.

Hope that helps.

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