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**UPDATE - 2020**

Due to COVID there is no public PIR. The graduations are on Thursday, and the video of the graduation is posted on RTC's FaceBook on Friday at approx 3pm. Please keep in mind that a division may need to complete additional quarantine during training which will delay their graduation.

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We now know of three FCs (Fire Control) are there others in the FC rating? Have they been to A school yet? C school...do you know where the C school is? Some of us are just trying to stay educated ;-) as we move into this next stage of our sailors lives!!!

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What is a Fire Controlman?
Fire Controlmen (FC) provide system employment recommendations; perform organizational and intermediate maintenance on digital computer equipment, subsystems, and systems; operate and maintain combat and weapons direction systems, surface-to-air and surface-to-surface missile systems, and gun fire control systems at the organizational and intermediate level; inspect, test, align, and repair micro/minicomputers and associated peripheral equipment, data conversion units, data display equipment, data link terminal equipment, print devices, and system related equipment; make analyses for detailed systems, computer programs, electronics, and electronic casualty control; and operate associated built-in and external test equipment; load, initialize, and run preprogrammed diagnostic, performance and testing routines for digital computer equipment, digital subsystems, digital systems, and overall combat systems.

Here is a general list of what we are responsible for…

ELECTRICAL/ELECTRONIC MAINTENANCE
ELECTRONIC SUPPORT EQUIPMENT
ELECTRONIC CASUALTY CONTROL
ELECTRONIC HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CONTROL
COMPUTER AND PERIPHERAL MAINTENANCE
COMPUTER SYSTEMS OPERATIONS
WEAPONS HANDLING/MAINTENANCE
COMBAT DIRECTION/WEAPONS DIRECTION/FIRE CONTROL SYSTEMS MAINTENANCE
COMBAT DIRECTION/WEAPONS DIRECTION/FIRE CONTROL SYSTEMS OPERATIONS
COMBAT SYSTEM READINESS ASSESSMENT
ELECTRONIC SYSTEMS MANAGEMENT
RADAR MAINTENANCE
We are a very unique rate that is responsible for numerous equipment.
Mary, from what the recruiter told us, their training is so involved, that they will have a 2 year degree in electronics by the time they finish C school. Have you heard anything like that?
My husband received TWO degrees while in the Navy over his 10 years. They receive a lot of credits in A school but they really multiply in the C school program. One of the things that Steve liked about the FC program is they operate and repair their systems themselves. Apparently with many systems, you either repair OR operate and they took great pride in NO one messed with their equipment!! They handled everything from A to Z and this is another reason why they are in school so long.
They told my son that he was obsessive complusive in boot camp, but in that program that is something that they don't want to fix. If something was broke he would take it apart and fix it because he can't help it. He is in the right program for his personality. But it is great to learn a skill that translates well to the outside world of electronics and computers. I had a nephew in the army that drove a tank for 4 years. When he was discharged that was all he could do.
I don't know if he knows it or not yet but upon successful completion of A school, he will be promoted to E4. This is a great field for advance opportunties for our boys. They will be first class before they know it.

Steve was telling Nick this weekend, that he still has his coffee mug that he received when he was promoted to First Class, it has the FC logo on it as well as his name and rank, ironically Nick's cup will read the same one day...just 20 + years later!
Oh CCR, I hate it when these things fall thru! Nick just graduated on Friday and he had looked at the nuclear program but decided to go AE/CF as he is a computer geek and his dad was an FC for 10 yrs. We have not talked to him since Sunday night but on Monday am - he was starting a five day indoc class from 7 am - 5pm before he moves to the ATT segment. Nick called his sister last night and she told me he was VERY stressed! He said he has classes all day, three watches this week and alot of tests that he knows he has to do well on. If their C school fall apart - is he still an FC candidate? FCs have to go thru C school from what I understand, my husband actually ended up going thru two C schools. When did he PIR? I wonder if he is in the in doc class that Nick is in...it just started yesterday. Nick is scheduled to be in GL for 30 weeks and then off to C school but I don't know where that is at yet. My husband's C schools were in mare island, CA and DamNeck, VA but the california base has been closed for awhile now. Keep us posted CCR
ohhhhhhh- rereading your email CCR, I think they all go thru the basic seamanship class - they try to give them a basic understanding of everything before they move into their speciality. It is true that if they don't do a good job in A school - they wont get to go to C school. They used to test my husband every week and if you scored under a 70 they would tutor you for the next test but if you did not get it - you could get pushed out of the program. I suspect that is why he said C school could fall apart. It is pretty intense training and they expect you to focus and do well and if you struggle in A school ...C school doesn't get easier.
This is all nail biting stuff. I know kyle is very motivated; however, as a mom, I can't help but be worried. How do you do good on tests if you have to stay on watch all night and class all day? Is there even time to study?
My husband assures me - they do have time to study and I think for the most part it is in the classroom. He will be okay Kelly but as a mother...we will always be biting our nails!
I'm sure he will do fine CCR, he was a good student in HS and they really keep reminding them how important the schools are so he will be fine. Your brother probably was not an FC if he was in Rhode Island, most of the FC jobs are on ships. My husband got shore duty for awhile but he was teaching at the C school for FCs.

Wow, he gets his civilian clothes already? That is quick! Nick was able to take his cell and laptop with him on Sunday when we left him at his new home but no civilian clothes yet. He said he has to stay in his dress uniform for two weeks. I will be in Chicago on may 12th for a business meeting and hoping that I can see him for dinner or something but not making any solid plans until he knows better what his schedule is.

My sister spend $82 shipping her son's laptop and cell phone but I think she 'overnighted" it and added insurance as well. Yikes - expensive stuff!

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