This site is for mothers of kids in the U.S. Navy and for Moms who have questions about Navy life for their kids.

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Choose your Username.  For the privacy and safety of you and/or your sailor, NO LAST NAMES ARE ALLOWED, even if your last name differs from that of your sailor (please make sure your URL address does not include your last name either).  Also, please do not include your email address in your user name. Go to "Settings" above to set your Username.  While there, complete your Profile so you can post and share photos and videos of your Sailor and share stories with other moms!

Make sure to read our Community Guidelines and this Navy Operations Security (OPSEC) checklist - loose lips sink ships!

Join groups!  Browse for groups for your PIR date, your sailor's occupational specialty, "A" school, assigned ship, homeport city, your own city or state, and a myriad of other interests. Jump in and introduce yourself!  Start making friends that can last a lifetime.

Link to Navy Speak - Navy Terms & Acronyms: Navy Speak

All Hands Magazine's full length documentary "Making a Sailor": This video follows four recruits through Boot Camp in the spring of 2018 who were assigned to DIV 229, an integrated division, which had PIR on 05/25/2018. 

Boot Camp: Making a Sailor (Full Length Documentary - 2018)

Boot Camp: Behind the Scenes at RTC

...and visit Navy.com - America's Navy and Navy.mil also Navy Live - The Official Blog of the Navy to learn more.

OPSEC - Navy Operations Security

Always keep Navy Operations Security in mind.  In the Navy, it's essential to remember that "loose lips sink ships."  OPSEC is everyone's responsibility. 

DON'T post critical information including future destinations or ports of call; future operations, exercises or missions; deployment or homecoming dates.  

DO be smart, use your head, always think OPSEC when using texts, email, phone, and social media, and watch this video: "Importance of Navy OPSEC."

Follow this link for OPSEC Guidelines:

OPSEC GUIDELINES

Events

**UPDATE 4/26/2022** Effective with the May 6, 2022 PIR 4 guests will be allowed.  Still must be fully vaccinated to attend.

**UPDATE as of 11/10/2022 PIR vaccination is no longer required.

**UPDATE 7/29/2021** You now must be fully vaccinated in order to attend PIR:

In light of observed changes and impact of the Coronavirus Delta Variant and out of an abundance of caution for our recruits, Sailors, staff, and guests, Recruit Training Command is restricting Pass-in-Review (recruit graduation) to ONLY fully immunized guests (14-days post final COVID vaccination dose).  

FOLLOW THIS LINK FOR UP TO DATE INFO:

RTC Graduation

**UPDATE 8/25/2022 - MASK MANDATE IS LIFTED.  Vaccinations still required.

**UPDATE 11/10/22 PIR - Vaccinations no longer required.

RESUMING LIVE PIR - 8/13/2021

Please note! Changes to this guide happened in October 2017. Tickets are now issued for all guests, and all guests must have a ticket to enter base. A separate parking pass is no longer needed to drive on to base for parking.

Please see changes to attending PIR in the PAGES column. The PAGES are located under the member icons on the right side.

Format Downloads:

Navy Speak

Click here to learn common Navy terms and acronyms!  (Hint:  When you can speak an entire sentence using only acronyms and one verb, you're truly a Navy mom.)

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Navy.com Para Familias

Visite esta página para explorar en su idioma las oportunidades de educación y carreras para sus hijos en el Navy. Navy.com

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Field Medical Training Battalion - commonly called FMTB or Field Med is an eight week program that provides extensive training in advanced emergency medicine and tactical combat casualty care (TCCC, or T-triple-C) and the fundamentals of Marine Corps life.  Physical conditioning, small arms familiarity, and basic battlefield tactics are part of this rigorous program.  Here's a good explanation of the rating Navy Hospital Corpsman, with FMTB described in the third paragraph of the section "Organization":

 

FMTB East is located at Camp Johnson next to Camp Lejeune in Jacksonville, North Carolina. 

FMTB West is north of San Diego, just north of Oceanside at Camp Pendleton, California.

Websites:
Welcome to FMTB East - what it is, what to bring, etc, view the link "LIfe at FMTB" too:  http://www.lejeune.usmc.mil/fmtb/fmst.shtml
Info about visiting:  graduation, maps, car passes, where to stay, etc: 
FMTB-E on Facebook:  Class photos and graduation information - https://www.facebook.com/FMTBeast


NavyforMoms.com groups
(and who knows why Lejeune and corpsmen are misspelled in the url's; whatever!)

FMTB coursework and review questions (classwork is the first half of Field Med):


FMF qualification is earned by Navy enlisted members assigned to the Fleet Marine Force of the U.S. Marine Corps who have successfully completed the necessary requirements of the Enlisted Fleet Marine Force Warfare Specialist (EFMFWS) Program. This involves serving with a Marine Corps Unit, passing a written test, demonstrating skills used in service with the Marines, and an oral examination by senior enlisted sailors who are FMF qualified.  Enlisted Warfare Specialist FMF Device Program: http://www.lejeune.usmc.mil/2dfssg/med/FAQ.html

Note on preparedness/fitness:  FMTB students can be held back a class if they fail the Body Mass Index (BMI) assessment by more than 3% or fail the initial physical fitness assessment.  If held back, they'll do Marine Corps PT three times a day, be put on a nutrition program, and run the risk of having their next orders changed.  So students must show up in good shape and be ready for push ups, pull ups, sit ups, and long hikes (four miles-plus) with heavy gear.  

That said, they all enjoy it and completing FMTB is a real accomplishment.  The graduation ceremony is great, try to attend if you can!  Here's info about Camp Lejeune graduation:

Not all attending FMTB go on to deploy with the Marines.  However, here is something good to know about that the Navy has produced for corpsmen about to deploy.  The Naval Health Research Center (NHRC) recently produced a 200-page graphic novel called "The Docs" as a communication tool to help Navy Corpsmen with the stresses of combat deployments. You can read the story and download the novel here:
http://www.navy.mil/search/display.asp?story_id=56546 )


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Hi all read through this and I had already read the "DOCS". I sure was a eye opener! Done well. They hit the nail on the head with this one. Wish they had done one for parent though. I would have covered different issues>
Nice pictures
How long is this training? Do HM's typically go to FMF after A school, I wasn't sure if it was a choice. My Husband just signed his HM contract to leave in September and I have almost no knowledge about the A school part. Thanks :)

Boot camp lasts 8 weeks, then straight to A school at the new Medical Education & Training Campus (link: http://www.metc.mil) at Fort Sam Houston in the city of San Antonio for 14 weeks where he will be a Hospital Recruit (HR), becoming a Hospitalman (HN) upon graduation.  As he moves up, he will be HM1, HM2, HM3. 

 Right now, most are then continuing on to Field Medical Training Battalion (commonly called FMTB, or Field Med, but not FMF) at either Camp Johnson, NC or Camp Pendleton, CA for 8 weeks, earning the Navy Enlisted Classification (NEC) of 8404.

New corpsmen will learn what their C School (chosen specialty, i.e. Surgical Technician) or first duty station will be towards the end of Corps School (A School).  Some, by the way, don't opt for C school but keep the general NEC 0000 (quad-zero) out of A school instead.  New corpsmen may be sent overseas, or stay stateside serving in hospitals and base clinics - but it all depends on the needs of the Navy at the time.  Going with the Marines is commonly called going green; stateside, blue.

Here is more info about HM NEC's that are available to corpsmen:  http://usmilitary.about.com/od/navynecs/a/hm.-urt.htm

 

 

Thank you so much, this was very helpful. So what do the FMTB do after training? Do they work with the marines at all? Do any of the HM's go FMF right out of A school?
FMTB is a program of in-depth 'field medicine' education and training with Marines. Right now nearly all A school grads go directly on to FMTB for eight weeks. Where a corpsman is assigned depends on many factors (C school being one). Obviously many are deployed with Marines - that's what they're essentially about. Many other corpsmen put their training to work on ships or in clinics and hospitals in a myriad of capacities. The Wikipedia link above gives a good overview of the rating.

Hi Deborah!  Yes, FMTB-West is at Camp Pendleton.  Carol and Vettespace have recent experience with 29 Palms training, so please post this question in the main group, they'll have good info for you.  I don't think that verbal orders are 100% but that's just my impression?  He should be getting it all in writing soon I'm sure. By the way, you may want to change your screen name; Navy for Moms admins ask that we not use last names on here, for the safety of our sailors :-)  See you on the CM&D main page!  

 

Hi Deborah, my son is also going to 29 palms in June, and I believe he is going to stay there for the next 2 years...but as you know nothing is set in stone...I'm just glad he's closer to home now...at least for a 8 weeks...wishing you and your son good luck....Nancy

Thought I should post this here for any moms or dads who want to see what FMTB is all about! This was filmed during my son's class in late fall/early winter 2010. It's a real eye-opener!

 

AWESOME video Carol. Thanks for sharing
question!! my son was in the last training hike during f.m.t.b. the 8 mile hike. He passed out from heat exhaustion, Is currently in the e.r., camp pendleton. hospital. he is ok. Thank God!! But is concerned whether he will graduate f.m.t.b.. the graduation is sept. 30th. I am asking if anyone knows...whether or not this will affect him graduating. He made it through al other aspects of training and passed with flying colors. It would be such a shame if this holds him back. Any and all information would be greatly appreciated!! He is very upset and worried!!  We have booked our trip to san diego for the graduation..and well would like to know if he will be able to graduate. No one seems to know! he has tried asking his superiors..but they havent given him a straight answer..yet.

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